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PLEASE NOTE: As of July, 2021, the Entomological Society of America no longer recognizes the common name gypsy moth for Lymantria dispar. Our website will be updated with the new common name after it is selected.

Plant Industry - Plant Protection Section
Entomological Services - Gypsy Moth Program
2022 Proposed Gypsy Moth Treatments

The North Carolina Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services proposes to treat eleven areas with Mating Disruption, no use of Gypchek or Btk.

As part of the environmental assessment process, the North Carolina Department of Agriculture & Consumer Services provides information on gypsy moth biology and treatment and solicits comments from the general public. As a courtesy to those who live in and around treatment areas, we also collect contact information if you would like to be notified the day before a specific treatment takes place. For more information about gypsy moth biology and treatment options, please click here to watch a short video or click on the embedded video below.

Please click on the map below to view treatment locations and to get information about public meetings for each proposed treatment location. For additional information please call 919-707-3730 or 800-206-9333. To submit a public comment for a particular treatment area or to request treatment notifications, please click here or submit the electronic form at the end of the webpage.

Proposed 2022 Gypsy Moth Treatment Blocks - type your address into the search bar on the map below to see if you reside in one of the proposed treatment blocks for 2022.

2022 Proposed Treatment Block Descriptions

Zionville area:This 867-acre proposed treatment block is located in Watauga County. A large part of Elk Knob State Park lies inside this block. The North Fork New River Creek branches off into the Mine Branch before they reach the block and the two waterways pass through the center of the block. Elk Knob State Park consists of a northern hardwood forest containing sugar maple, yellow birch, American beech, and yellow buckeye. In 2019, we caught a total of twenty-nine male moths, signifying that a reproducing population was present. This area was treated in 2020 and although the numbers decreased, we caught 15 male moths in 2021. With eradication being our goal, one application of mating disruption is proposed for this block in late May or early June.

Glade Valley area: This 802-acre proposed treatment block is located in Alleghany County. The block is located just west of the intersection of US HWY 21 S and the Blue Ridge Parkway. Although most is privately owned land, this block contains a portion of the Bullhead Mountain State Natural Area. There are three residences in the block. In 2019, we caught twenty-two, signifying that a reproducing population was present. This area was treated in 2020 and although the numbers decreased, we caught 14 male moths in 2021. One application of mating disruption is proposed for this block in late May or early June.

Cana area: : This 915-acre proposed treatment block is in Surry County and continues north into Virginia. On the North Carolina side, this block is bordered by Pipers Gap Road and White Pines Country Club Road. Hardwood forests are present throughout most of the block. There are approximately 50 residences in the block. In 2020, we caught a total of three male moths in this block. In 2021, that number increased to nineteen, signifying that a reproducing population is present. One application of mating disruption is proposed for this block in June.

Price area: This 812-acre proposed treatment block is in the northwest corner of Rockingham County. Although most is privately owned land, a portion of the Mayo River State Park is in this block. The Mayo River runs directly though the block. There are approximately eight residences in the block. In 2020, we caught a total of four male moths in this block. In 2021, that number increased to twenty-five, signifying that a reproducing population is present. One application of mating disruption is proposed for this block in June.

Park Spring area: This 949-acre proposed treatment block is in Caswell County. The block is located west of NC HWY 86. Hogan’s Creek runs through the center of this block. There are approximately 11 residences in the block. In 2020, we caught a total of twelve male moths in this block. In 2021, that number increased to twenty-seven, signifying that a reproducing population is present. One application of mating disruption is proposed for this block in June.

Vicksboro area: This 285-acre proposed treatment block is in Vance County. Vicksboro Road runs through the center of this block. There are approximately 40 residences in the block. In 2020, we caught a total of zero male moths in this block. In 2021, that number increased to seven, signifying that a reproducing population is present. One application of mating disruption is proposed for this block in June.

Lake Drummond area: This 5673-acre proposed treatment block is in Camden County and continues north into Virginia. On the North Carolina side, this block consists mostly of the Great Dismal Swamp National Wildlife Refuge and Dismal Swamp State Park. There are no residences in the block. In 2020, we caught a total of four male moths in this block. In 2021, that number increased to one hundred forty-seven, signifying that a reproducing population is present. One application of mating disruption is proposed for this block in late May or June.

Knotts Island area: This 311-acre proposed treatment block is in Currituck County and continues north into Virginia. This is a quarantine county for Lymantria dispar. In 2020, we caught a total of four hundred eighty-two male moths in this block. In 2021, that number increased to eight hundred fifty-two. One application of mating disruption is proposed for this block in May or June.

Martin Point area: This 3168-acre proposed treatment block is the Duck area in Dare County. In 2020, we caught a total of two male moths in this block. In 2021, that number increased to twenty-seven. One application of mating disruption is proposed for this block in May or June.

Mossey Island area: This 1933-acre proposed treatment block is in Currituck County. This is a quarantine county for Lymantria dispar. In 2020, we caught zero male moths in this block. In 2021, that number increased to twenty-three. One application of mating disruption is proposed for this block in May or June.

Buxton area: This 1194-acre proposed treatment block is on the west side of Buxton in Dare County. NC 12 passes through the northern side of the block and Cape Hatteras National Seashore lies to its south. It is a mix of residential areas, commercial development, and one large maritime forest. There are small streams, canals, and swamps in the block and the Pamlico Sound borders the north side. Wooded areas are composed of oaks, pines, and various other hardwoods and conifers. Past treatments of mating disruption and Gypchek and Bacillus thuringiensis var. kurstaki at this site reduced the population significantly, but follow-up trapping indicates there is still a reproducing population present within this block. In 2020, we caught a total of thirty-nine male moths in this block. In 2021, that number decreased to twenty. One application of mating disruption is proposed for this block in May or June.

 

For Additional Information Contact:
Paul Adams - Regulatory Entomologist
Phone: (919) 707-3742
Fax: (919) 733-1041

 

Back to Gypsy Moth Program Main Page

NCDA&CS Plant Industry Division - Plant Protection Section
Division Director - Dr. Bill Foote
Mailing Address: 1060 Mail Service Center, Raleigh NC 27699-1060
Physical Address: 216 West Jones Street, Raleigh NC 27603
Phone: (919) 707-3730 | FAX: (919) 733-1041



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