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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
WEDNESDAY, NOV. 16, 2011

CONTACT:

James Burnette Jr., director
NCDA&CS Structural Pest Control and Pesticides Division
919-733-3556

N.C. Pesticide Board announces November case settlements

RALEIGH — The N.C. Pesticide Board recently approved the following settlement agreements for respondents in Alamance, Alleghany, Catawba, Duplin, Edgecombe, Gaston, Guilford, Lee, Moore, New Hanover, Perquimans, Pitt and Wayne counties, as well as Pomona, Calif.; St. Joseph, Mo.; Toledo, Ohio; Lititz, Pa.; and Reading, Pa.

  • Industrial Paper Products of Burlington agreed to pay $600 for selling adulterated pesticide AFBC Disinfectant Bowl & Bathroom Cleaner in North Carolina. The pesticide was found to be adulterated in that it was ineffective against S. aureus.

  • William Blan Bottomley, owner of Bottomley Evergreens & Farms Inc. in Ennice, agreed to pay $1,200 for supervising the application of pesticides Permethrin, Pristine Fungicide and Thionex 3EC in a manner inconsistent with their labeling to a pumpkin field in Ennice. Spray drift from the application was carried into a neighboring bedroom, causing a neighbor to experience coughing, shortness of breath and a burning sensation in his nose. The label states to avoid applying the pesticide in a way that will contact other persons.

  • Chad F. Goans, superintendent of Rivercrest Golf Club in Hickory, agreed to pay $500 for applying pesticides without a pesticide applicator’s license. Neither he nor anyone associated with Rivercrest Golf Club had been licensed to apply pesticides at the time the applications of concern were made.

  • Scott P. Thigpen of Beulaville agreed to pay $500 for applying restricted-use pesticide Drexel Atrazine 4L without a current applicator’s license.

  • Richard C. Anderson, of Anderson Farms Inc. in Tarboro, agreed to pay $900 for disposing of pesticides Acephate 97UP, Drexel Chlorpyrifos and others in a manner inconsistent with their labeling. The pesticide containers were disposed of at a dump site, and their labels state they should be recycled or disposed of in a sanitary landfill.

  • Benny R. Bowles, owner of Bowles Management Inc. of Mount Holly, agreed to pay $800 for applying Target 6 Plus and Talstar P Professional Insecticide without a current pesticide applicator’s license. Neither he nor anyone associated with Bowles Management had been licensed to apply pesticides at the time the applications of concern were made. In addition, Bowles failed to store unattended pesticides in a manner that would prevent unauthorized access.

  • Handi-Clean Products Inc. of Greensboro agreed to pay $600 for selling adulterated pesticide Handi-Clean Foam-O-Cide Germicidal Cleaner in North Carolina. The pesticide was found to be adulterated in that it was ineffective against S. aureus.

  • Handi-Clean Products Inc. of Greensboro agreed to pay $600 for selling adulterated pesticide N-Formula Disinfectant Cleaner Deodorant in North Carolina. The pesticide was found to be adulterated in that it was ineffective against P. aeruginosa and S. aureus.

  • Mark E. Thomas, owner of Diversity Landscaping in Sanford, agreed to pay $600 for applying Nufarm Credit Extra without a current ground applicator’s license. Neither he nor anyone associated with Diversity Landscaping had been licensed to apply pesticides at the time the application of concern was made. In addition, Thomas applied the pesticide in a manner inconsistent with its labeling.

  • Philip R. Dallas, of Dallas Turf & Aquatic Solutions in Cameron, agreed to pay $500 for applying restricted-use pesticide Scimitar GC without a current pesticide applicator’s license.
  • Cory S. Crawford, owner of Centurion Lawn Care Inc. in Wilmington, agreed to pay $500 for applying pesticides Barricade and Celsius WG Herbicide without a current pesticide applicator’s license.

  • William D. Nixon, of Belvidere Farmers Exchange in Belvidere, agreed to pay $800 for refilling a stationary bulk tank with Roundup PowerMAX without a containment pad in the dispensing area, for failing to perform monthly inspections on the stationary container and containment structures, and for failing to keep proper records as outlined in Part 165 of Title 40 of the Code of Federal Regulations.

  • Milton D. Sawyer, of J. P. Davenport & Son in Greenville, agreed to pay $500 for treating wheat seed with Allegiance-FL Seed Treatment and Raxil MD Extra Fungicide without a current ground applicator’s license.

  • Tony M. Jones, owner of Smith Chapel Supply & Ag Services Inc. in Mount Olive, agreed to pay $1,800 for selling restricted-use pesticides without being a licensed pesticide dealer and for selling restricted-use pesticides to a non-certified applicator. In addition, Jones failed to follow storage and record-keeping guidelines for the restricted-use pesticides.

  • Ultra Chem Labs of Pomona, Calif., agreed to pay $600 for selling adulterated pesticide Ultra General Cleaning Ultra-Q128 in North Carolina. The pesticide was found to be adulterated in that it was ineffective against S. aureus and P. aeruginosa.

  • Hillyard Industries of St. Joseph, Mo., agreed to pay $600 for selling adulterated pesticide Hillyard Suprox-D in North Carolina. The pesticide was found to be adulterated in that it was ineffective against P. aeruginosa.

  • Hillyard Industries of St. Joseph, Mo., agreed to pay $600 for selling adulterated pesticide Hillyard Q.T. in North Carolina. The pesticide was found to be adulterated in that it was ineffective against P. aeruginosa.

  • Betco Co. of Toledo, Ohio, agreed to pay $600 for selling adulterated pesticide Betco AF315 in North Carolina. The pesticide was found to be adulterated in that it was ineffective against P. aeruginosa and was contaminated with Gram-positive bacilli.

  • Woodstream Co. of Lititz, Pa., agreed to pay $600 for selling adulterated pesticide Safer Brand Garden Fungicide for Flowers, Fruit & Vegetables in North Carolina. The pesticide was found to be adulterated in that it was excessive in sulfur and deficient in sulfur in two separate analyses.

  • Misco Products Co. of Reading, Pa., agreed to pay $600 for selling adulterated pesticide MPC Maintenance Solutions Sani-512 in North Carolina. The pesticide was found to be adulterated in that it was contaminated with Gram-negative bacilli and was ineffective against P. aeruginosa and S. aureus.

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NCDA&CS Public Affairs Division, Brian Long, Director
Mailing Address:1001 Mail Service Center, Raleigh NC 27699-1001
Physical Address: 2 West Edenton Street, Raleigh NC 27601
Phone: (919) 707-3005; FAX: (919) 733-5047

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