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FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
THURSDAY, MAY 14, 2009

CONTACT:

James Burnette Jr., director
NCDA&CS Structural Pest Control & Pesticides Division
(919) 733-6100

N.C. Pesticide Board April settlements announced

RALEIGH — The following settlement agreements for respondents in Burke, Chowan, Halifax, Mecklenburg, Pasquotank, Richmond, Robeson and Tyrrell counties were recently approved by the N.C. Pesticide Board:

  • Ronald L. McDonald of St. Pauls agreed to pay $200 for using pesticides Roundup Original Max, Prefix CP herbicide and Reflex Herbicide inconsistently with their labels. McDonald also purchased air induction nozzles to lessen the probability of drift in future pesticide applications. The pesticides damaged nearby crops, and their labels state they shouldn’t be applied when weather conditions favor drift from treated areas. The application was made by McDonald’s stepson, but as the pesticide license-holder, McDonald was held responsible.
  • Roderick V. Leary, president of Leary Plant Farm in Edenton, agreed to pay $800 after failing to maintain and post pesticide application information for pesticides Subdue Maxx, B-Nine WSG, Credit Systemic Extra Herbicide and Cycocel. Leary also failed to provide several workers with training. The pesticides’ labels require license-holders to provide application information and training in accordance with the Worker Protection Standard, and it is unlawful to use any pesticide in a manner inconsistent with its labeling.
  • Donald L. Parks, an employee of C.A. Perry & Son in Elizabeth City, agreed to pay $1,700 for selling the restricted-use pesticide DuPont Asana XL Insecticide to a non-certified applicator. Selling this pesticide to anyone not certified as an applicator is not consistent with its label, which states it should be purchased and used only by certified applicators or under their direct supervision.
  • Brian D. Hopkins, an employee of Meherrin Chemical Co. in Columbia, agreed to pay $1,200 for selling the restricted-use pesticide Tenkoz Atrazine 4L to a non-certified applicator. Selling this pesticide to anyone not certified as an applicator is not consistent with its label, which is against state law.
  • Roy H. James of Columbia agreed to pay $300 for purchasing and applying a restricted-use pesticide without a license. Purchasing this pesticide without up-to-date certification is not consistent with the pesticide’s label, which states it should be purchased and used only by certified applicators or under their direct supervision.
  • Alton R. Hamill of Helena Chemical Co. in Enfield agreed to pay $1,200 for selling restricted-use pesticides Bicep II Magnum, Gramoxone Inteon, Temik 15G and Guardsman Max to a non-certified applicator. Selling these pesticides to anyone not certified as an applicator is not consistent with their labels, which state they should be purchased and used only by certified applicators or under their direct supervision.
  • Martha Calderon of Calderon Produce in Morganton agreed to pay $1,200 for improper disposal of pesticide containers. An inspector found burned pesticide containers at the farm, which is against state law.
  • David A. Sherrill of David’s Produce in Ellerbe agreed to pay $600 for using pesticides Abound and Tracer on collards on his farm. The pesticide is not labeled for use on collards, and it is unlawful to use any pesticide in a manner inconsistent with its labeling.
  • S. Stuart Pierce Jr. of Ahoskie Fertilizer Co. Inc. in Ahoskie agreed to pay $800 for selling restricted-use pesticide Baythroid XL to a non-certified applicator. Selling this pesticide to anyone not certified as an applicator is inconsistent with its label, which states it should be purchased and used only by certified applicators or under their direct supervision.
  • Wepak Corp. of Charlotte agreed to pay $600 for misbranding its pesticide Wepak Mint Disinfectant, in that it falsely claimed to be effective against P. aeruginosa. A second batch of Wepak Mint Disinfectant was found to be contaminated with Gram-positive bacilli. It is unlawful for an adulterated or misbranded pesticide to be distributed, sold or offered for sale.
  • Terry L. Saunders of Helena Chemical Co. in Inman, S.C., agreed to pay $600 for using pesticides inconsistently with their labels at an EnergyUnited substation in Stanley, N.C. The pesticides damaged nearby grass, and their labels state they shouldn’t be applied on or near desirable trees or other plants. EnergyUnited contracts with Helena Chemical Co. to maintain its substations.

-kwj-1

 

NCDA&CS Public Affairs Division, Brian Long, Director
Mailing Address:1001 Mail Service Center, Raleigh NC 27699-1001
Physical Address: 2 West Edenton Street, Raleigh NC 27601
Phone: (919) 733-4216; FAX: (919) 733-5047

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